How are Google, Band-Aids, Wite-Out, and Geoforce Related?

 

When was the last time you heard someone say:

“Hmm, I don’t know. I’ll search engine it.”

“I cut my finger! I need adhesive bandage.”

“Doh! I made a mistake! Hand me correction fluid.”

I’m guessing the answer is never. But you probably hear the following all the time:

“I’ll Google it.”

“I need a Band-Aid.”

“Hand me the Wite-out.”

Google, Band-Aid, and Wite-out are, without a doubt, the leaders in what they do. As such, they have generated universal acceptance as generic terms or verbs uttered without a second thought. Kleenex, Q-tip, Xerox, Chapstick, Tupperware, Velcro, Post-Its, and many more come to mind as well.

Geoforce believes inherently chaotic field operations don’t actually have to be chaotic at all. As our contribution to the “Internet of Things” (IoT) revolution, since 2007, we have enabled field operators and service providers to connect “things” like containers, tanks, generators, light towers, and fleet vehicles to the “internet”.

This connection happens by installing our rugged GPS tracking devices on such “things”, and connecting them to our web-based software and other applications. By connecting these “things” to the internet, we provide operational intelligence that significantly minimizes the chaos of field operations in the oil & gas, agriculture, construction, mining, transportation, logistics, and many other sectors.

The tremendous growth of our network of “connected things” over the last 9 years has been amazing. In fact, we currently have the largest deployment of connected oilfield equipment in the world. Hearing success stories from our over 500 customers in 70 countries certainly makes us smile.

But we’ll smile even bigger when, like Google and Band-Aid, we are universally acknowledged as the leader in what we do, and we start hearing even more companies use Geoforce like this:

“Did y’all Geoforce that?”

“Just Geoforce it for crying out loud!”

“I’m not worried, that tank’s been Geoforced!”

With smartphones so prevalent these days, we all “just expect” we will always have access to the world’s knowledge by having the “internet in our pocket”. Similarly, field operators will eventually “just expect” to have immediate access to knowledge about the location and status of their field equipment. Of course we believe Geoforce will become the “generic term” providing that valuable knowledge.

And when that happens, we’ll jump in our Jacuzzi, sip a Coke, and enjoy a Popsicle to celebrate!