Breaking Down the GT1

 

The Coolest – and safest – GPS device in the industry
The original Geoforce GT1 asset tag has had amazing industry acceptance since its introduction earlier this year (2013). For everything it is, though, it lacked one significant feature: international intrinsic safety certification. The GT1 has been certified as intrinsically safe since it was introduced, but compliant with U.S. and Canada, only using the current UL913 5th edition.   Completing the same certifications for Europe (ATEX) and International (IECEx) has been an extremely difficult endeavor. It required countless design and packaging iteration to secure the coveted “Zone 0” certification.   The goal was to secure the intrinsic safety level consistent with permanent installation in highly explosive environments. This translates to the Zone 0 certification – something no other GPS satellite tracking device in the world can claim. And – as of last month – we’re proud to say the GT1 is now the only GPS-satellite asset tag that carries this mark for Europe (ATEX), International (IECEx), U.S. and Canada.   What it means for our customers is that they don’t have to worry about where their assets are going to be deployed, which is a real problem for most of our customers who have highly mobile assets that end up in a wide variety of locations in the energy sector. For many of our customers, it is Zone 0 or nothing. This has been a real problem for our international customers since – before the GT1 – there were no GPS-satellite asset tags that carry this mark.   The technical hurdles for Zone 0 were very high. International certification requirements are much more difficult to achieve than the domestic UL913 5th edition required today. To make matters worse, these U.S. domestic requirements are transitioning to harmonize with the international regulations in place today, as the UL913 7th edition becomes the standard. The new GT1 is years ahead and compliant today with this harmonized 7th edition intrinsic safety standard.   The GT1 carries an impressive list of certifications and compliance verifications, far outpacing any other similar device. It is the only product specifically designed for the rigors of the heavy industrial energy market, and now with international intrinsic safety it will become the de facto standard in our primary business sector.   The latest GT1 truly stands alone.   GT1 Certifications and Compliance reports:

  • Intrinsic Safety
    • IECEx
    • IEC 60079-0: 2011 (for hazardous locations safety – Ex Class I Zone 0 Group IIC classification)
    • IEC 60079-11: 2011 (for hazardous locations safety – Ex Class I Zone 0 Group IIC classification)
    • IEC 60079-26: 2006 (for hazardous locations safety – for Ga equipment protection level)
  • ATEX
  • EN 60079-0: 2012 (for hazardous locations safety – Ex Class I Zone 0 Group IIC classification)
  • EN 60079-11: 2012 (for hazardous locations safety – Ex Class I Zone 0 Group IIC classification)
  • EN 60079-26: 2007 (for hazardous locations safety – for Ga equipment protection level)
  • USA
  • ANSI / UL 61010-1: 2012 (for ordinary locations safety)
  • ANSI / UL 913: 2011 (for hazardous locations safety – Class I Division 1 Groups A-D classification)
  • ANSI / UL 60079-0: 2009 (for hazardous locations safety – AEx Class I Zone 0 Group IIC classification)
  • ANSI / UL 60079-11: 2011 (for hazardous locations safety – AEx Class I Zone 0 Group IIC classification)
  • ANSI / ISA 60079-26: 2011 (for hazardous locations safety – for Ga equipment protection level)
  • Canada
  • CAN / CSA C22.2 No. 61010-1: 2012 (for ordinary locations safety)
  • CAN / CSA C22.2 No. 157-92: R2012 (for hazardous locations safety – Class I Division 1 Groups A-D classification)
  • CAN / CSA C22.2 No. 60079-0: 2011 (for hazardous locations safety – Ex Class I Zone 0 Group IIC classification)
  • CAN / CSA C22.2 No. 60079-11: 2011 (for hazardous locations safety – Ex Class I Zone 0 Group IIC classification)
  • Electronics and Radio Compliance
    • Wireless/Electrical
    • USA FCC (Federal Communications Commission)
    • Part 15, Subpart B
    • Part 15, Subpart C
  • Canada IC (Industry Canada)
  • ICES-003
  • RSS-210
  • European Union CE (Conformité Européenne)
  • ETSI EN 301 441
  • ETSI EN 301 489-1
  • ETSI EN 301 489-20
  • ETSI EN 300 440
  • ETSI EN 301 489-3
  • ETSI EN 300 328
  • ETSI EN 301 489-1
  • ETSI EN 301 489-17
  • RoHS – 2002/95/EC
  • Australia
  • C-tick (N23156)
  • Brazil
  • ANATEL Homologation (1348-13-9043)
  • Environmental Compliance
    • IP68 to 10meters
    • IP69K
    • MIL-STD-810G; Method 512.5 Immersion Procedure I, Immersion
    • MIL-STD-810G; Method 518 Acidic Atmosphere
    • MIL-STD-810G; Method 501.5 High Temperature (Procedure I) Storage – Cyclic
    • MIL-STD-810G; Method 502.5 Low Temperature (Procedure I) Storage
    • MIL-STD-810G; Method 502.5 Low Temperature (Procedure II) Operation
    • MIL-STD-810G; Method 501.5 High Temperature (Procedure II) Operation – Cyclic
    • MIL-STD-810G; Method 503.5 Temperature Shock (Procedure I-C)
    • MIL-STD-810G; Method 516.6 Mechanical Shock, Procedure I, Functional Shock, (Flight Equipment, 20g, 11ms, sawtooth)
    • MIL-STD-810G, Method 516.5 Crash Shock Procedure V, Crash Hazard, 75g, 6ms, sawtooth
    • MIL-STD-810G; Method 509.5 Salt Fog
    • MIL-STD-810G; Method 505.5 Solar Radiation (Sunshine) Procedure I, Cyclic
    • MIL-STD-810G; Method 507.5 Humidity Procedure II, Aggravated
    • MIL-STD-810G; Method 521.3 Icing/Freezing Rain Procedure I, Glaze Ice